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Systems Alliance Blog

Opinion, advice and commentary on IT and business issues from SAI
Keyword: acadia

We’ve been busy collecting feedback over the past several months, and it’s always interesting to see the parallels between various industry verticals.  From our manufacturing clients like Anheuser Busch and Mohawk, to healthcare clients such as Sheppard Pratt Health System, we’ve heard loud and clear how valuable it is to easily report on the data contained within Acadia so more robust reporting has been the focus with our newest release, Acadia 5.7.0.  Below is a list of the improvements which will be ready to use when you log in on Friday, October 14.

Improved Feedback Report

We’ve updated the Recent Feedback report to provide access to user feedback for all active documents on the system, all in one place. In addition to accessing a specific document’s feedback via its document report, the Recent Feedback report now has a “view all” option. Advanced filtering and sorting allow you to quickly access the feedback you need to improve your critical policy and procedure documentation. Keep an eye out for even more improvements in our document feedback reports in future releases.

 

Acadia Feedback Report

 

Document Task Report

Task management has proven to be a game changer for our clients. Managing the execution of “one best way” procedures by converting procedure documents to task lists has caught on, particularly with our manufacturing clients. With our 5.7.0 release, we’ve added the ability to view a report of all task lists generated from a specific procedure document. Simply browse to any procedure document and access the document report to see the status of all task lists associated with that procedure.

 

Acadia Task Report

 

Redesigned Document Report Screen

While on the topic of document reports, they’ve been completely redesigned to provide better filtering and a more cohesive experience. The addition of tabs allows you to quickly and easily switch between Acknowledgement, Quiz, Feedback, and Task reports without leaving the document report screen. Behind the scenes, an all-new reports framework improves performance while allowing more ways to sort and filter your data.

 

Acadia Document Report Screen

 

Manual and Routine Rollup Report

Manuals and routines are an effective way to combine related content into larger bodies of work. With Acadia 5.7.0, you’ll now be able to see combined document reports for every document in a manual or routine. We’ve even added the new task report to manuals and routines containing procedure documents. In addition to increasing the usefulness of manuals and routines, this rollup report lays the groundwork for things to come in future releases.

 

Acadia Rollup Report

 

Better Search Term Indication

When it comes to usability, sometimes a very minor change can make a big difference.  By increasing the contrast of search term matches, we help ensure that there is no doubt as to why a document returns in your search results. You’ll notice this difference the first time you search for a document in Acadia.

 

Acadia Document Search

 

Improved Mobile Experience & Bug Fixes

We strive to make our product much more usable with every release, and this release is no exception. In addition to robust reporting enhancements, we’ve made numerous changes to improve the mobile experience in Acadia. Finally, we found some bugs along the way and squashed them in short order.

We hope you’re as excited about these new features as we are and we look forward to announcing the improvements in next month’s release. As always, keep the feedback coming!

Imagine you are an end user for a complicated application. You find yourself stuck - unable to finish your work because you’re unfamiliar with the operation you’re trying to perform. What resource would you turn to for help?

For most users today the next step involves a search bar – whether it’s a purpose built in house tool or the ubiquitous Google. They grab only the information they need to complete their work and move on.

Now put yourself on the other side of the table as the vendor.  Is the knowledge you just gave the end user a product of just in time training or is it application support?   If the content and the means of delivery are exactly the same, does it really matter what you call it?

Training

Two Sides of the Same Coin 

The only clear way to draw contrast between these two processes is the delivery timing.

Training is effectively Support that’s being delivered before users know they need it. It is the proactive introduction of information to end users before they understand enough to know what to ask. This needs to be delivered when users are learning for the first time or when there have been substantial changes in the way they utilize your products or services.

Support, delivered well, becomes both problem resolution and just in time training that happens to reinforce or refresh the user’s knowledge. It is the reactive delivery of information provided when users request it. With shrinking attention spans, it can often be difficult to recall every component of training after it’s been delivered.  Reinforcing previously learned material to apply knowledge, understand a change, or resolve an issue (self-help) would fall under support.

Three Things to Consider

In the emerging world of “Customer Success”, distinctions between training and support are subsumed into the greater objective of satisfying your customer’s requirements at the right time (right now) and making it as easy as possible.

With traditional training and support models being disrupted as they crash into one another, it’s important to start thinking about how your organization delivers content to end users. Here are three things to consider:

1.       Do you have the right tools?  Let’s jump back to our search savvy end users. Their expectations are high when it comes to tools.  If your tools aren’t as easy to use and as fast as the Google Search bar, they’re going to look elsewhere. If they’re not using your tool, is the information they get going to be accurate? Will that hurt your relationship with the customer?

At the same time, as your customer base grows, scalable and asynchronous delivery is generally cheaper to provide than a one on one interaction with the customer success team.  This doesn’t mean you can skimp on content or launch a poorly thought out self-help tool.  Substantial investments are still required to plan and execute or you’ll end up spending on both as users give up on using your self-help tools and call for help.

2.       Is your content structured correctly?  Boring, lengthy, and dated content that requires a substantial investment of users’ time is out. Short, informative, and search indexed content that is built for “microlearning” is in.  Give your users what they want and nothing more.

3.       Does your “training” inform your “support” and vice versa?  Your model has to be flexible enough to allow a continuous feedback loop. Input directly from end users as well as reviewing trending data from your ticketing system can drive improvements and help you determine what is the most important content to add, highlight, or refresh over time.  Failing to adopt an agile approach will decrease the value of the content over time.

Interested in learning more?

Ready to jump in and figure out how to better serve your end users?  Check out our website at SystemsAlliance.com to find more IT Strategy and Operations insights or visit Acadia-Software.com to learn how the Acadia Performance Platform is providing critical content to drive effectiveness at organizations like Mohawk Industries and Anheuser Busch InBev.​

 

Non profits around the region are scrambling to address budgetary gaps caused by changes in labor laws. As leaders scramble to find solutions, overlooked opportunities may exist to cut operating costs and grow revenues through smarter application of information technology.

On July 1st, the minimum wage in Maryland increased by nearly 6% while in DC it jumped by almost 10%.  On June 27th, District took things a step further as the Mayor signed a bill to raise the city’s minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2020.  Similar legislation is expected to pass soon in the City of Baltimore.  These changes are being rapidly followed by another expensive policy change: New FLSA overtime rules will go into effect this December adding to the already heavy pressure on regional nonprofits’ budgets.

Unless nonprofit leaders find innovative ways to cover these substantial payroll cost increases, many will be forced to make tough decisions in the next few months. A recent article in the Baltimore Business Journal highlighted the potentially devastating effects that the wage increases could bring, with some fearing that organizations may be “forced to cut services, lay off workers or even shift locations”. 

This is obviously a nightmare scenario for many organizations and unless we are prepared to see diminished roles for important nonprofits around the region, action must be taken now to ensure these institutions can continue to serve the community.

One of the ways proactive leaders can get ahead of this coming fiscal crunch is by ensuring their organizations are running at peak efficiency.  For many that means a much closer look at their Information Technology portfolios including capabilities, budgets, and governance.

IT Capabilities

Information technology has grown tremendously powerful in the last few decades.  Staff are walking around today with more computing power in their pockets than the systems that guided astronauts to the moon.  Just because IT is powerful though, doesn’t mean it is being optimally deployed in an organization.

Nonprofits have traditionally lagged behind other industries in adopting new technologies.  Many hold on to systems long past what most corporate organizations would consider to be the useful service life.  This may have saved money by deferring replacement costs, but as these systems age, they bring other problems to light.  Support costs often increase over time as it becomes more and more difficult to find qualified staff to maintain systems and applications.  In addition, a lack of automation, an inability to integrate systems, and the emergency of inefficient processes that have grown up around out of date technology are all a drag on the efficiency of today’s nonprofits.

Beyond the hardware, software, and services being deployed, many organization aren’t able to maximize their existing IT investments due to gaps in their users’ knowledge.  Targeted training focused on process improvement, better and more approachable documentation, and an ongoing effort to grow knowledge should be a part of any IT planning initiative.

IT Budgeting

When it comes to budgeting, IT is often seen as a cost center, meaning that its budget should be reduced during lean times. This thinking is shortsighted and outdated. Approaches like taking an “across the board cut” in organizations often misfire.  After all, there are numerous examples where an increase in IT budgets drove substantial cost reductions elsewhere in the business.  If deploying new IT capabilities can deliver efficiencies elsewhere, how does cutting the IT budget make sense?

Similarly, attempting to align IT budgets with benchmarks from across the industry often delivers less than stellar results.  These numbers lack any sort of reflection to the organization’s structure, scale, capabilities, or mission.  Attempting to budget based solely on these numbers is therefore meaningless.

IT Governance

One of the least understood components of information technology is IT Governance.  Put simply, this is the method by which decisions about IT are made and executed.  Decision rights for IT go beyond the IT department or the CIO, and involve a broad base of stakeholders. There are two very common governance structures that both have substantial drawbacks for organizations undergoing change. 

The first is a decentralized, ad-hoc approach to IT. This is a weak form of governance where decisions are often made by individual users, managers, or departments.  A lack of standardization and planning has predictable results.  Systems and applications are often incompatible with one another and the costs to maintain the IT infrastructure is very high.

The second is more of a “dictatorship” model where a strong IT department dictates standards, deploys systems, and defines the future plans for the organization.  The gap here is that while the trains may run on time, they don’t necessarily go where users need them to.  The end users are often left wanting (sometimes they revolt) and IT can end up misaligned with the rest of the organization.

A better path is to strike a balance between these two approaches.  Certain aspects of IT should be managed by the IT department, but with input from users, leadership, and even outside advisors.  Other decisions should be left to others, with IT in a supporting role to enable their vision. Creating an effective governance structure allows organizations to maximize the utility of their IT investments and have control over its direction.

#TimeForAChange

As progressive reforms around compensation continue to sweep through the region, it is time for nonprofit leaders to prepare their organizations to meet the upcoming fiscal challenges.  IT planning and strategy should be a key part of that conversation.  If you’re ready to get started before things get rough, here’s a couple of options to consider:

  1. Move Infrastructure to the Cloud – This shifts your fixed costs to variable costs which can adjust to reflect the size and scope of your organization.  Reduced complexity of in house infrastructure also means you can potentially reduce your IT staffing needs. Significant discounts given to nonprofits by the major cloud players (Microsoft, Google, & Amazon) make this a very affordable proposition if you have the right team on your side to plan and manage the transition.
  2. Consider New Applications to Reduce Costs – IT is ubiquitous throughout your organization, but are you using it to cut back on costly administrative tasks?  Reducing overhead around policies and procedures can free up senior staff to focus on the mission instead of shuffling papers around.  Cutting training time means you can quickly train staff and reduce your onboarding costs.  This is going to be particularly important for high turnover roles that will be increasingly expensive to fill.  Having a solution that validates employee compliance and acknowledgement around policies can lower the risk of legal action.  All of these can be addressed with one solution: Acadia Performance Platform
  3. Revamp Your Web Presence – Does your website drive donors to you or is it a source of frustration?  Are visitors able to understand your mission and help support your goals?  Can your staff update and maintain it without having to jump through hoops?  If your website doesn’t match the professionalism of your organization, redesigning it can help bring you more success.

Mark Stirling is the Director of SAI’s IT Strategy and Operations practice and has worked closely with nonprofit clients including the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore. You can find more of his posts and other insights from SAI on the Systems Alliance Blog.

Last week the Department of Health and Human Services announced a $218,400 settlement with St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center in Brighton, MA relating to a HIPAA compliance violation. 

This enormous fine wasn’t the result of employees deliberately leaking information.  It didn’t come as a result of a major data breach caused by criminal hackers.  It came about because hospital administrators didn’t have adequate controls in place around their IT.

From the Boston Globe:

“The settlement… comes after federal regulators investigated a 2012 complaint that employees at St. Elizabeth’s used an Internet-based document sharing program to store health information of at least 498 patients.”

Employees who likely meant well started putting sensitive data into the cloud.  That’s a major shadow IT headache for any organization.  For those businesses that are subject to HIPAA or other compliance requirements, it’s also a very expensive headache.

Back to the Globe:

“Organizations must pay particular attention to HIPAA’s requirements when using Internet-based document sharing applications,” Jocelyn Samuels, director of the HHS’s Office for Civil Rights, said in a statement. “In order to reduce potential risks and vulnerabilities, all workforce members must follow all policies and procedures, and entities must ensure that incidents are reported and mitigated in a timely manner.”

Think this can’t happen to your organization? Wrong.  According to the AMA, even if you’re in the dark about the rules you can be fined up to $50,000.  That’s a lot of money for an honest mistake.

hipaa requirements

Acadia healthcare policies

 

 

If you’re handling any kind of sensitive patient data on your network, now is the time to take notice. Here’s where you should be focusing your efforts:

Training, Training, and More Training: Compliance issues are a people problem, not a technology problem. Having organization-wide understanding of compliance obligations is non-negotiable.  Eradicating shadow IT and making sure that all of your employees understand why they can’t use the latest fad cloud application without permission is vital.  Stop letting users make mistakes out of ignorance.

Policies and procedures and tools to share them matter.  Doctors may take an oath to do no harm but if they or other staffers don’t know the rules, how could they know if they’re hurting patients through noncompliance?

 

 

policy tip

User Proofing Wherever Possible: Having active control around where sensitive data is stored and how it is transmitted is crucial.  That means you need a technical solution in place to enforce control obligations.  Systems that don’t enforce the standards by default will burn you.  This could be anything from automated filters to watch for particular content in emails, to encryption software that secures data at rest. 

Robust IT Governance Processes: Is your IT department disconnected from the strategic direction of the business?  How well aligned are IT’s priorities when compared with the end users?  Fixing gaps like these discourages users from trying to implement shadow IT.  If stakeholders are engaged through an IT Steering Committee or other governance structure they have the power to keep IT aligned with their needs.  There’s no reason to go it alone if you’ve got organizational partners who are focused on enabling the business.

Not sure where to get started?  SAI can help.

Documentation. screenshot of network documentation

It’s considered a profanity in every IT department. Yet every technician in every IT shop will agree that documenting IT processes and procedures is essential to managing an effective IT organization.

Process documentation allows IT staff to be more effective by:

  • Increasing the consistency with which you execute repeatable processes

  • Allowing subject matter experts to share operational knowledge with general IT staff

  • Enabling more staff members to complete service changes, thereby increasing operational efficiency

  • Lowering the barrier of entry for folks entering new roles within the organization

  • Mitigating the risks associated with IT service changes

  • ...Read More
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