Ready to embark on a website overhaul? Here’s where to start.

At SAI, we interact with many types of clients, from non-profits to commercial organizations to educational institutions. Despite their unique characteristics, we hear the same core concerns over and over: We know our website needs changes, but we don’t really know how to go about the process of a redesign.

Does this sound familiar? As we’ve shared before, there is often little or no separation between your website and your organization itself. When interacting with your website, it doesn’t matter whether a user is conducting a complex transaction on a desktop or a quick search on mobile; they are making rapid judgments about your brand as a whole based on their experience.

Convincing key decision makers at your organization that your web presence needs attention can be challenging, especially if executives perceive “attention” as “spending a lot of money.” Getting internal support for a big project is harder for some organizations than others, and there are many variables to consider. Depending on the size of your company and the complexity of your website, you could be looking at a significant investment. The key is to influence decision makers of how the investment will ultimately help your organization meet its goals.

If the thought of obtaining buy-in from leadership for a website redesign seems daunting, read on.

  1. Form a committee.  Before the vendor is selected or the first piece of code is written, we suggest a meeting of the minds to agree on objectives. Identify a group of people who are representative of your organization’s goals and interests—about 4-6 key players. Try to select people who (a) have a stake (i.e., the website could actually impact their part of the business), and (b) have some sway. The key is to identify top influencers. 
  2. Set a recurring meeting. Ensure this effort remains a priority by treating is like a “real” project. Set a regular meeting schedule and collaborate using a project management platform to track notes and progress in a central location. We like Basecamp and Taiga, but there are unlimited options on the market. (And no, we don’t get a kickback for our referrals!)
  3. Define business goals. Work with your newly formed committee to identify 3-5 critical business objectives that the new website can help solve. For example, in a membership association, these goals might be metrics like “increase membership” or “increase sales revenue from existing members.”  Getting support from executives for a big project investment will be twice as challenging if you can’t tie the project to a few critical goals.
  4. Define vision and requirements. When you’re making the case that your website needs to be redesigned, it helps if you can articulate a vision for the site—specifically, who is your target audience? How does your web presence need to look and feel? Why/how is it falling short today? From a requirements perspective, what does the site need to accomplish at a bare minimum? What technical requirements ought to be considered (e.g. hosting, using a web CMS, etc.)?
  5. Identify success metrics. Executives think in terms of results, so identifying success metrics—and how you plan to track them—are key.  For a website, these could be tactical goals like increasing web traffic, reducing bounce rates or increasing online leads. You could also think more broadly by tying measurable goals related to sales revenue, market share, etc.

Converting Momentum to Action

Once you’ve formed your committee, identified business goals and success metrics, and presented this information to internal stakeholders, you’re going to run into the question, “how much is this going to cost?” That’s a tough question to answer, because it really depends on what kind of web presence you have today, and what capabilities you want to obtain in the future.

Do your homework to get a sense of the general investment you will need to make. Interview a few companies and ask for cost estimates. A more formal option is to issue a Request for Information (RFI) or a Request for Proposal (RFP) and compare different agencies. If you’re looking for more information, please message me and I’d be happy to connect you with some more tools.